District of Columbia Crime Policy Institute

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Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Availability of PSH for the Disabled Reentry Population (DCPI Research Link)
Sam Hall, Martha R. Burt, Caterina Gouvis Roman, Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper reports the extent to which currently available permanent supportive housing serves ex-offenders, as well as the willingness of supportive housing providers to serve this population if appropriate supportive services are available.

Published by: Urban Institute
Publication Year: 2009 Availability: HTML


Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Cost of Services (DCPI Research Link)
Sam Hall, Martha R. Burt, Caterina Gouvis Roman, Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper presents the number of days of jail and shelter and the number of responses by Fire and Emergency Medical Services (FEMS) for people using the D.C. Jail between October 1, 2004 and March 31, 2008, public emergency shelters between October 1, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and FEMS between January 1 and August 31, 2008, as well as the cost of these services to District agencies.

Publication Year: 2009 Availability: HTML


Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Population Overlaps (DCPI Research Link)
Sam Hall, Martha R. Burt, Caterina Gouvis Roman, Jocelyn Fontaine

The study found significant overlap among individuals served by the three systems. A small proportion of the jail population that is often homeless when not in jail uses homeless shelters and FEMS. By focusing on providing reentry housing for persons when they leave jail, coupled with services to frequent users of FEMS with disabilities, the District of Columbia could reduce recidivism in the jail population while improving public health. The study recommends working through the D.C. Interagency Council in developing or expanding collaborative mechanisms that will improve the transition from jail back into the community so as to avoid homelessness for people with serious disabilities who are at risk for returning to jail. A pilot project should be developed to provide permanent supportive housing to a reasonable number of frequent users of jail and homeless shelters who also have a major mental illness or other serious disability. Such a project should be a collaborative effort of D.C. government agencies, nonprofit housing and service providers, advocates, and members of the target population. The project should establish a definition of frequent users of District services.

Published by: Urban Institute
Publication Year: 2009 Availability: HTML


Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Data Sources, Methods, and Limitations (Research Brief)
Sam Hall,Martha R. Burt,Caterina Gouvis Roman,Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper presents the number of people who used jail only; shelter only; jail and shelter; jail, shelter, and Fire and Emergency Medical Services (FEMS); multiple spells in each, and a mental illness disability, for people using the D.C. Jail between October 1, 2004 and March 31, 2008, public emergency shelters between October 1, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and FEMS between January 1 and August 31, 2008.

Published by: The Urban Institute
Publication Year: 2009 Availability: PDF


Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Availability of PSH for the Disabled Reentry Population (Research Brief)
Sam Hall,Martha R. Burt,Caterina Gouvis Roman,Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper reports the extent to which currently available permanent supportive housing serves ex-offenders, as well as the willingness of supportive housing providers to serve this population if appropriate supportive services are available.

Published by: The Urban Institute
Publication Year: 2009 Availability: PDF


Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Cost of Services (Research Brief)
Sam Hall,Martha R. Burt,Caterina Gouvis Roman,Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper presents the number of days of jail and shelter and the number of responses by Fire and Emergency Medical Services (FEMS) for people using the D.C. Jail between October 1, 2004 and March 31, 2008, public emergency shelters between October 1, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and FEMS between January 1 and August 31, 2008, as well as the cost of these services to District agencies.

Published by: The Urban Institute
Publication Year: 2009 Availability: PDF


2008 Criminal Justice Coordinating Council Annual Report (DCPI Research Link)
Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Annual Report of the Criminal Justice Coordniating Council (CJCC)

Published by: Criminal Justice Coordniating Council
Publication Year: 2008 Availability: HTML


Fact Sheet: Offender Reentry in Washington, DC (DCPI Research Link)
Court Service and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA)

Contents: Risk & Needs Assessment, Close Supervision, Treatment and Support Services, Community-Based Support

Published by: Court Service and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA)
Publication Year: 2008 Availability: HTML


2007 Criminal Justice Coordinating Council Annual Report (DCPI Research Link)
Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Annual Report of the Criminal Justice Coordniating Council (CJCC)

Published by: Criminal Justice Coordniating Council
Publication Year: 2007 Availability: HTML


Global Positioning System (GPS) Technology for Community Supervision: Lessons Learned (DCPI Research Link)
Tracy M.L. Brown, Steven A. McCabe, Charles Wellford

The key lessons learned from veteran global positioning system (GPS) program administrators, officers, and staff were many, however the areas of impact included: (1) agency liability; (2) caseload/workload; (3) client accountability; (4) client impact; (5) crime investigation; (6) deterrence/behavior modification; (7) GPS components and technology; (8) GPS funding and costs; (9) GPS stakeholders; (10) standards and evaluation; (11) training; and (12) vendor relationship. Key success factors identified by agency respondents in the implementation of a GPS included: (1) client compliance; (2) client perception; (3) equipment/vendor quality; (4) good education of stakeholders; (5) pilot programs; (6) policies and procedures; and (7) staff knowledge and dedication. The challenges identified during implementation and ongoing operations included: (1) client compliance; (2) client selection; (3) determining caseload; (4) equipment issues; (5) GPS stakeholder education; (6) imposing change; (7) policies and procedures; (8) training; and (9) victims. Suggestions for improvement and changes to GPS technology, equipment, software, and program operations were reported by agencies. Through an expressed interest by practitioners to know more about how GPS was being used by other agencies, and understand the lessons gained from agencies experienced in using GPS technology, the U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice sponsored the Noblis Center for Criminal Justice Technology’s (CCJT’s) efforts to conduct a study of agency experiences with implementing and managing GPS as part of their supervision programs. Agencies that participated in the study included: (1) City and County of Denver, Colorado Electronic Monitoring Program; (2) Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia (Washington, DC); (3) Marion County, Indiana Community Corrections; (4) New Mexico Corrections Department; (5) Oakland County, Michigan Community Corrections; (6)

Published by: Noblis
Publication Year: 2007 Availability: HTML


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